For many business owners, your business’s Search Engine Optimization, or SEO, might as well be your annoying younger sibling. It’s always bothering you and you’d rather ignore it than try to understand what it’s talking about.

However, ignoring your SEO is NOT the right decision. No matter how hard you try to pretend it doesn’t exist, SEO makes a huge difference in driving potential customers to your website.

Simferopol, Russia - July 13 2014: Google biggest Internet search engine. Google.com domain was registered September 15, 1997.

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As search engines have evolved, so has the process of getting your website indexed and ranking well on them. It’s no longer possible to add some keywords to your website and expect it will be returned in search results when someone searches using those terms. Search engines today return results based on what they interpret the searcher’s query to mean, rather than by just picking out certain “key” words or phrases.

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On April 2, 2014, Google officially released Universal Analytics, a new tracking code created to replace their Classic Analytics tracking code. According to Google, the Classic Analytics tracking code will continue to function for two years from the release of Universal Analytics; however, being proactive in upgrading will help ensure you don’t lose any Google Analytics data.

For in-depth details about upgrading to Universal Analytics, visit the Universal Analytics Upgrade Center. […]


You may have heard the phrase “content is king”, but weren’t sure you believed it. After all, you’ve spent so much time, money and effort getting your website in perfect working order. Fresh new design? Check. Responsive to mobile devices? Check. Search engine optimized? Check. What else could you need? Well, quite a bit actually.

Google (and all search engines for that matter) has been changing the way it ranks websites and quality content has become a major component in their ranking algorithms. When you think about it, that makes perfect sense. Google makes most of its money through paid advertising which it displays above, next to and below organic (non-paid) search results. Google wants people to use their search engine as often as possible, as this gives them more changes to show their ads which they hope will get clicked (this is the point at which Google gets paid). If you were to use their search engine and didn’t get the information you needed, you’d stop using their search engine. This is why quality content is so important.

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Keyword ranking has long been a method used for determining how well your website is performing in the search engines for a specific term. Although this used to be a great tactic, things have changed. Search Engines, Google in particle, have been encrypting more and more of their keyword data making it difficult for website owners to determine which keywords drive traffic to their site. […]

If you want your site to perform well in Search Engines, the best practices to follow are known as White Hat. White Hat marketing is when you put the time and effort and use integrity to create a website that your potential audience will find useful; nothing more, nothing less.  There are no skip the lines or get out of jail free cards; if you want your site to rank well, you need to make sure you are following White Hat SEO best practices. […]

For local businesses, showing up at the top of the search engine results page is extremely important. With the ever-changing search engine algorithms it’s getting harder and harder to figure out what works to get you there. There is no exact formula to accomplish this goal, but there are some known factors which you should consider priority SEO tasks. […]

More and more, a company’s website is the first, valuable interaction with a new customer. Is your website stuck in the Stone Age (and by Stone Age, I mean the 90’s and 00’s)?  What impression are you giving the 58% of American adults who according to Pew Research Center research the products and services they are interested in online before purchasing or engaging a company? […]

Over the past couple of months, I’ve written several posts about structured data markup and the increasing importance of building machine-readable context and descriptions into content that’s created for the web. Structured data is already used by the major search engines to provide enhanced search result listings, and it’s also used by mobile search providers to produce more accurate local search results.

The trouble is that the world of structured data isn’t all nice, neat and orderly. There’s no single standard “how to” on using structured data markup. The W3C — the organization that develops and manages most of the web’s open standards — recommends two different structured data specifications. The Resource Description Framework in Attributes (RDFa) was developed over a period of years by a W3C working group. The Microdata specification was promoted primarily by the major search players (Google, Yahoo and Bing), and then taken on by another W3C working group in a sort of shotgun wedding. […]

Back in April, Google released a new major update to its search algorithms under the project name “Penguin”. The update didn’t cause the same amount of chaos and panic that followed the 2011 Panda update, but it still took a big bite out of the search ratings for a number of (previously) highly-ranked websites.

The Panda update (in February 2011) hammered very profitable websites known as “content farms” because it devalued or negatively rated duplicate content and content that the algorithm judged “low quality”. Now that the dust has settled from the Penguin roll out, it appears this update focused heavily on the quality of a site’s incoming links and on the “spamminess” of its content. […]

Nearly everyone who owns a website wants to see it perform better in the search engines. Good search results are especially critical for business websites that are expected to generate leads or produce e-commerce sales.

Unfortunately, a lot of business owners give up on search engine optimization — or settle for sub-standard results — because they think good optimization is too expensive. While an investment in top-notch SEO work is seldom wasted, two very effective SEO tactics fall into the Do It Yourself category and are often overlooked by many webmasters and site owners. […]

When you start looking through all of the statistics regarding your website, it can be hard to sort out what’s important from what’s merely interesting. Web stats reporting packages can confront you with a staggering variety of reports. There are as many opinions on what you should worry about as there are crackpot theories about The Government hiding what’s really happening on the far side of the moon. […]