At some point in your online life you’ve probably visited a website where a form popped up asking you to fill out some basic information: name, email, phone number, etc. Maybe you’ve never filled one out, or maybe you’ve filled them all out (which is why you spend the first 15 minutes of your day deleting promotional emails from your inbox). Either way, you understand the concept.

These forms, a.k.a. lead forms, are actually a tool that website owners use to get more information about their current customers or new customers. They also allow website owners to stay in contact with customers, keep them informed, or provide them with certain benefits. […]

If you are hearing a lot of references to the phrases “mobile-friendly”, “responsive mobile” or “mobile responsive” in regards to website design and not quite sure what all this means, you are not alone.  You may also be aware that these phrases somehow play into your Google rankings but are not entirely sure how or why? Let’s review so we can come away with a clearer understanding.

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We’re a little under a week away from the April 21st mobile search deadline and we know that you’re thinking, “This is the end!” And if this was Penguin/Panda, we’d be right there with you, screaming that the sky was falling and everything (non-mobile) was coming to an end. However, It’s not.

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Colors attract attention, set a mood and make a statement – all things designers keep in mind when creating a website.

In fact, research shows 84.7 percent of people say color is the largest factor when choosing products. Even more interesting, most buyers make a subconscious decision about a product within 90 seconds of the initial viewing. That being said, color is one of the largest aspects to consider when designers build a website.

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It is a big decision to make when you are deciding on which company you’d like to create your website. You want to make sure your expectations are clearly communicated with the company, and that you have an agreement that these expectations will be met. The last thing you want is to pay out a large amount of money on a website that neither meets your expectations nor brings in results for your company. To help you choose a web design firm that will meet your expectations, here are 5 important questions to ask before hiring Design Company. […]

If you haven’t started considering a mobile website, now is the time. Smart phone technology and usability has increased, which has led to traffic from mobile devices to increase dramatically over the past few years. Your site can see traffic as high as 50% from mobile devices, especially if you are using any type of social campaigns to promote your business. If you are still not convinced you need a mobile site, check out this blog article that provides detailed information on why you need a mobile site. […]

Even a person who doesn’t stay up to date on internet trends has probably heard that mobile usage has exploded. Technology has grown so much that our mobile devices and tablets have the same functioning capability as a laptop or desktop computer. We as a country have become so dependent on our cellular devices that most people would not be able to successfully get through one day without theirs. Business Insider reported that mobile internet users will grow larger than desktop users this year, in 2014.

What does this mean for your website? Do you know what percent of your customers are visiting your website from their mobile device? Can customers properly navigate your website from a mobile or tablet device? By navigate, I mean make purchases, schedule appointments, or any other activity that has been set up on your site. After answering these questions, are you still not convinced that you need a mobile site? Below are some more reasons that explain how critical a mobile website is for your company. […]

Your website is an opportunity for you to make a good impression and help existing and potential customers decide whether or not they should do business with you.  Even if your business is mostly offline (i.e. you don’t have an ecommerce site), you should still be very worried about the impression you are making online.  The majority of consumers now use the web to research everything from the new restaurant that opened downtown to the accounting firm they are considering bringing business to next year.  Even if their purchase or business transaction will happen in the “real” world, their decision is often made before you even get to meet your potential customer.

You only get one chance to make a good first impression, so avoid these common pitfalls at all costs! […]

More and more, a company’s website is the first, valuable interaction with a new customer. Is your website stuck in the Stone Age (and by Stone Age, I mean the 90’s and 00’s)?  What impression are you giving the 58% of American adults who according to Pew Research Center research the products and services they are interested in online before purchasing or engaging a company? […]

Over the past couple of months, I’ve written several posts about structured data markup and the increasing importance of building machine-readable context and descriptions into content that’s created for the web. Structured data is already used by the major search engines to provide enhanced search result listings, and it’s also used by mobile search providers to produce more accurate local search results.

The trouble is that the world of structured data isn’t all nice, neat and orderly. There’s no single standard “how to” on using structured data markup. The W3C — the organization that develops and manages most of the web’s open standards — recommends two different structured data specifications. The Resource Description Framework in Attributes (RDFa) was developed over a period of years by a W3C working group. The Microdata specification was promoted primarily by the major search players (Google, Yahoo and Bing), and then taken on by another W3C working group in a sort of shotgun wedding. […]

In last week’s blog post, I wrote about structured data markup. That brings up the question of why you might want to consider adding some elements of this markup vocabulary to your website’s code.

I’ve read a few articles in prominent, non-technical publications that promote the use of structured data markup — using the Microdata format sponsored primarily by Google, Bing and Yahoo — as a method of improving SEO. Unfortunately, that’s not quite accurate. In fact, the major search engines have made it abundantly clear that using an extended markup like Microdata (or any of the other vocabularies) has no impact on a page’s search ranking. […]

If you’re very observant, or if you just spend a lot of time poking at Google or Bing, over the last year or so perhaps you’ve noticed that the search engines are returning results that are a lot more informative than they used to be. “Old” style search are familiar and straightforward; they’ve got a page title, a URL and some text (usually from the content). […]